POSB PAssion Run for Kids ’13

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8 September 2013 – It was pouring throughout the last few days leading up to this race, & it continued to do so even on the event morning itself. I woke up at 0430hrs, had breakfast while contemplating whether or not to go, after the disappointment at the cancellation of KOTR last month due to inclement weather.

At 0500hrs, accessed the weather, & felt that the rain has subsided alot, hence, changed & left the house. Drove to race site & parked at Wilson Parking, close to the Marina Promontory, surprised that there was plenty of space when I got there.

Was surprised to find the start pen empty even at 0605hrs. Must have been the weather, everyone was hiding under the tents. I did some strides & headed to the start as soon as the Emcee announced for 10km runners to gather there.

© People's Association - Membership & Partnership Division

© People’s Association – Membership & Partnership Division

having a chat with fellow ST Run in the Park runner, Ronnie Teo. He shared with me that he did a 22km LSD the day before, so legs were not 100%.

© People's Association - Membership & Partnership Division

© People’s Association – Membership & Partnership Division

I asked Ronnie to start up front, but he didn’t want to, so I just went to cover up the gap.  Was not my original plan to be on the tape after a successful outing at AHM, where I was three rows behind the front runners.

© People's Association - Membership & Partnership Division

© People’s Association – Membership & Partnership Division

Mok Ying Rong, who eventually came in first for the Women’s Open Category was among the 10km field.

© People's Association - Membership & Partnership Division

© People’s Association – Membership & Partnership Division

3,2,1 GO! off we go!

© People's Association - Membership & Partnership Division

© People’s Association – Membership & Partnership Division

Off we go!

© People's Association - Membership & Partnership Division

© People’s Association – Membership & Partnership Division

just coming into the 3km mark, about to cross the Marina Barrage to Gardens by The Bay(East).Can see eventual winner just behind me at the point of time, he overtakes at 5.5km mark & basically wins by huge margin.

Photo Credits: Chasing Shots

Photo Credits: Chasing Shots

coming up the Marina Barrage after the 6km mark, skipped the water point just before coming up as I was feeling reflux.
Photo Credits: Chasing Shots

Photo Credits: Chasing Shots

at this point I was half dying till I saw Mr. Chasing Shots disappear & reappear at the top of Marina Barrage, sitting on field chair, camping under his camo net(umbrella) & rifle(camera) in hand like a sniper, suddenly got motivation to run, cannot let the man down, after he brave the rain for us runners.
Photo Credits: Chasing Shots

Photo Credits: Chasing Shots

so the two very fast marathoners were using this race as training, Ronnie who finished London Marathon in 3hrs, & did 22km LSD the day before, & Thow Wee that finished Gold Coast Airport Marathon ’13 in 2hrs 53mins. stress!coming down the barrage, I turned to muscle memory dig into to the hill training I did previously, going up the hill & sprinting all out down hill without gassing out.

Photo Credits: Chasing Shots

Photo Credits: Chasing Shots

after the race, found out he is from Guards fmn, & was school team runner before, congrats Jeevaneesh!

© People's Association - Membership & Partnership Division

© People’s Association – Membership & Partnership Division

the face says it all. all these months of hard work has paid off! SUB40 10k!
© People's Association - Membership & Partnership Division

© People’s Association – Membership & Partnership Division

Well done, Ronnie! Impressive even after 22km LSD, still managed to fire legs.

© People's Association - Membership & Partnership Division

© People’s Association – Membership & Partnership Division

I swear trying to write your details down right after a run is no joke.
© People's Association - Membership & Partnership Division

© People’s Association – Membership & Partnership Division

Group photo with some fast runners, including Singapore Marathon record holder Rameshon, GCAM 4th Singaporean, Lim Thow Wee, Mok Ying Rong, & Winner, Jeevanesh.
© People's Association - Membership & Partnership Division

© People’s Association – Membership & Partnership Division

First podium finish, a little bit nervous to be going up on stage to receive prize from People’s Association(PA)’s Chief Executive Director, Mr. Ang Hak Seng.
Photo Credits: Melinda Koh

Photo Credits: Melinda Koh

target splits for this race. use pace band generator to create splits: http://www.runnersworld.co.uk/racing/runners-world-pace-band-generator/3918.html

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Cute Medal!

photo-wonder if I can really chase a squirrel now. saw some at MR recently, but they are too fast.

photo-12hope can use this to inspire my kids(if I ever have any) in the future!photo-11

Race Results:
Race Reflection
Coming into this race, I was determined to prove that the false accomplishment at AHM was no fluke. So I had set the target time to 39:00 in order to have a 1min buffer. I started the way I always start if I was on the tape, take the lead first, somehow cannot curb natural instinct.Found myself running next to Mok Ying Rong & was doing a 3:48/km or 3:58/km time for the first Km. Yes, I could not see the digits on my watch because it was so dark! Settled into this rhythm, & felt really comfortable, like I would be able to carry on like this all throughout.

Coming into the Marina Barrage at 3km mark, heard some footsteps behind, hence had to break away from Ying Rong to defend the lead. Held on to this lead till apprx the 5.5km mark when could not match the long strides from Jeevanesh, had to slow down & let him go.

Was thinking of taking a cup of water before heading up the Marina Barrage, but my stomach told me otherwise. Guess, I made the right choice as I felt like puking. Soon as I climbed the Marina Barrage, saw Jeevanesh coming down the opposite sight, & that was the last time I saw him.

I felt footsteps closing in on me halfway towards the top, & decided to take a sprint down the Marina Barrage. This was something I have been practicing at MacRitichie reservoir in the past few months.

At the flower domes, a caucasian runner suddenly jogged next to me & asked if he could run with me, I told him, sure why not? I knew that if one of the runners behind overtake me, somehow I would slow down from previous experience, so I guess it would been good if I had some company down this last 2+km.Decided to skip the waterpoint under the Helix bridge too as I felt like Ronnie & Thow Wee was too close for comfort. I even saw them as I was going down the U-turn towards the MBS boardwalk. Talk about pressure!

Would like to thank the caucasian runner for all the motivation, he was tell me stuff like “Good pace” “let’s go, don’t slow down now” “that’s the way!” I was literally running my guts out in the last 2km, constantly increasing speed as I approached the FINISH.

Course Advice:

Very straight forward, flat course, except for the Marina Barrage. Please include some hill training if you want to conquer the Barrage without a hitch. Tricky double U-turns right after coming under the Helix Bridge, transiting to the MBS Boardwalk area.
Credits: POSB

Credits: POSB

Next Race:
15 September 2013
Yellow Ribbon Prison Run – 10km
Changi Prison

Straits Times Run in the Park 2013 [Updated]

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25 August 2013 – Right after accomplishing my main goal of finishing a triathlon this year, had to refocus on attaining my 2nd goal of this year, which is to get a SUB40 10k.

I wanted to put myself in a position where I would have enough chances to get that coveted SUB40 10k. Hence, I signed up for five 10km races in a short span of 6weeks. I know that once I’ve broke it once, the flood gates will open for me to secure more good performances enroute to a SUB1:30 half-marathon & eventually qualification to Boston.

Woke up at 0430hrs, left the house after a light breakfast of a banana & some Pocari Sweat. Arrived between 0515hrs – 0530hrs & had to go round to find a parking lot. The Treelodge @ Punggol (Blk305) was completely full, same with a neighbouring block, so had to proceed to a multi-storey carpark at block 602 & finally managed to find a spot at level 5.
  
Headed to the start line & orientated with the starting 100m of the course, before proceeding to do some warm-ups. By this time I noticed the top 15km runners already doing some warm runs.
After the 15km flag-off at 0645hrs, I was stationed to line-up upfront, but to my surprise, there wasn’t anyone that was too eager to go right to the front of the line. Probably all the top runners were at CSC Run by the Bay, or RunNUS, or in the 15km race earlier on. I did notice a familiar face in the New Balance athlete, who I lined-up alongside in the Pocari Sweat Run in June.
At the Start Line. Love the LED digital display being adopted here. It was interactive & had sponsors changing from time to time. I’m decked in Neon Green for this run.
Photo Credits: Run Gallery SG

Photo Credits: Run Gallery SG

Hot 91.3fm DJs leading the warm-up in the background.

Photo Credits: Run Gallery SG

Final picture before the flag-off.

Photo Credits: Run Gallery SG

[Start: Updated with new photos]
Wave for the cameras!

Photo Credits: 100PLUS

Photo Credits: 100PLUS

Trading high5s w/ fellow SAFRA Jurong Running Club member, Joyce. Happens that we were part of the winning relay team for SJRC back in 2010.

Funny how John & Joyce were promoting their FIXIEs to me at AHM REPC just the day before, & next day I’m lining up with them in the race. Congrats on your 5th place finish Joyce!
Photo Credits: 100PLUS

Photo Credits: 100PLUS

Metal barricades removed, we are ready to go.

Photo Credits: 100PLUS

Photo Credits: 100PLUS

Photo Credits: 100PLUS

Photo Credits: 100PLUS

[End: Updated with new photos]

3,2,1 Horn goes off. VIP Flags us off. Here we go!
Check out the flag-off here on RazorTV: http://instagram.com/p/ddU1m5uYqo/

Photo Credits: Run Gallery SG

Maybe its instinct, but I immediately took the lead.

Photo Credits: Run Gallery SG

Which was a terribly bad idea, something that I should really learn not to do.

Photo Credits: Run Gallery SG

Photo Credits: Run Gallery SG

Makes for a good photo, but I would learn to pay dearly in the final km of the race. The eventual winner is to my left, he would later finish in a time of 37mins+. He took the lead once we headed down the first slope into the Punggol Waterway.

Photo Credits: Run Gallery SG

Photo Credits: Run Gallery SG

This was heading up the Sunrise Bridge, approximately after the 3rd km. After starting in a 3:30 pace for the first km, I decided to drop it down to 4:00 for the 2nd & 3rd km. Coming up this bridge, I was in a time of 11:30, with a 30second buffer on that SUB40 10k.

Photo Credits: Running Shots

Photo Credits: Running Shots

At this point, I was being tightly chased by other 10km runners. The two runners behind me would eventually catchup & overtake me when we entered the trail portion of the race.

Photo Credits: Running Shots

Photo Credits: Running Shots

At this point of time, it was coming into the final 400m of the course.

Photo Credits: Eye-See-Eye-Shoot

Photo Credits: Eye-See-Eye-Shoot

Home stretch, decided to make a dash for the FINISH, even though I knew it was too little too late.

Photo Credits: Running Kaki

Photo Credits: Running Kaki

At the hydration point after the FINISH. Spotted Mr. Chasing Shots, the man behind the camera at many races. Had a chat with him &  asked him why he does it? Camera was underused, & he liked doing it! Really respect the guy for taking photos of runners pro bono, plus he is super friendly! Congrats on your PB!

Photo Credits: Ironman Runner / Chasing Shots

Photo Credits: Ironman Runner / Chasing Shots

Some photobooth fun at the Carnival area.

Photo Credits: Straits Times

Photo Credits: Straits Times

I know I always say it, but I absolutely love the medal for this run, a Traditional, round, weighted medal that doesn’t feel cheap.

Medal Medal2

Was fortunate enough to be amongst the Top25 for the Men’s Open Category, so I had a Winners medal on top of the Finishers medal. I was also lucky enough to come in Top10 for the first time ever, hope it won’t be the last.Medal3

no PB or SUB40 10k today, but somehow managed to win free one-year Straits Times subscription for my family!

Here are the results:Credits: Runpix

Credits: Runpix
Credits: Runpix

Credits: Runpix

Credits: Runpix

Credits: Runpix

Reflection: In the lead up to this race, I was expecting to run the KOTR, but it was cancelled. That week I suffered a minor hamstring pull after not cooling down properly after a swim. Hence, I had to scale back the miles to prevent further injury. I also came down with a virus that very same week, having a bout of sore throat & flu symptoms. I couldn’t complete key workouts like a 4 X 2km workout due to the hamstring injury, I had to pull out after my first lap of my 2nd set. So I didn’t have the confidence going into that race. I’m glad it was cancelled as I could smell disaster pending.

The tuesday following the triathlon, I managed to complete the key 4 X 2km workout, giving me confidence that I could do it if I maintained a constant pace from the start. But I emphasize constant.

This race, I was looking out for a fast runner that could do 39mins for 10km, but scanning the field, I couldn’t recognise anyone that I knew could do it. It seemed that everyone was reluctant to go to the front of the pack, maybe its for good reason.

This entire race was more mental than anything else. I was focused throughout, stabilizing my pace from 4-9km, hitting all the kilometer marks with at least 30seconds buffer.

Have to thank a fellow runner, Ronnie, who was pacing me from 4-9km. The moment he was running by my side, I felt more confident. He signalled for overtakes a couple of times, and even offered his drink to me at the Hydration Point! But I already grabbed the wrong cup(water), should have got an isotonic drink instead. This proved deadly coming into the last km.

As we stepped up the pace for the final km, it was Ronnie, a guy in the Trail running top & myself heading strong together. But then the severe stitch occurred. & no matter how much I lifted my arm & exhale on the right foot, the stitch wouldn’t go away. I just had to bear with the pain & turn it down a notch, letting the two runners go.

Felt incredibly slow coming into the FINISH line, this is something I will work on in training.

[Start: Updated new insight]
After much post-race analysis, I troubleshooted the problems down to the following:
1. Equipment Failure
The inner tights I was using was too tight & constantly riding up, causing diaphragm not to be able to function to full capacity.

2. Changing of breathing pattern
For some reason, I started to alter breathing pattern to “rhythmic breathing In-2, Out” fast & shallow breathing at 9km mark, causing the bad stitch.

3. Poor running form nearing the end
When I get tired, I tend to disregard my running form, & have a tendency to look down on the ground rather than look far ahead, this causes the head to tilt downwards slightly, & blocks the airway to the lungs. My body posture starts to slouch, & this could be the cause of the stitch. In fact, come to think of it, I felt it coming, my abs were starting to cramp, probably due to the bent over posture I was adopting. My legs also tend to feel heavy & can’t lift as high as I would like.

This is something I definitely would be working on in training.

4. Starting too fast
I started at 3:30/km pace for the first km because there was just two runners ahead of me, & I was just keeping up the pace. As I am just wearing a very basic Casio watch with just a stopwatch function, I have to rely on the distance markers to determine the pace I am going at. Hence, I am constantly caught out at too fast a pace if I follow the front pack.

Next race definitely will start conservatively & overtake runners from the back rather than get overtaken & messes with the psychology of racing.
[End: Updated new insight]

Race Course Advice: The whole course is nice & flat, there was a potential choke point on the Sunrise Bridge, but to my surprise, when I got there, it was not bottlenecking at all. Maybe its due to the fact that it was still early on in the race & the majority of the 15km runners have not passed that point.

There is a trail section on the portion adjacent to Serangoon Island. Big fan of trail in training as it is light on the feet, not so much in racing as it tends to slow the pace down.

Enquire with a few runners, most told me that the course was 10.20 – 10.22km long. Hence, it would be an additional 30-50 seconds to cover. Maybe its a consolation to myself, but I think my performance was sub-par & lacklustre. Time to turn it up a notch for Army Half Marathon.

Credits: Straits Times

Credits: Straits Times

Next Race:
01 September 2013
SAFRA Bay Run & Army Half Marathon– 10km
Esplanade Bridge

25 to 25

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In a month’s time I’ll turn 25. Yes, a Quarter of a Century.

Since my 24th birthday, I have been mulling my impending milestone in life. In fact, during the last whole year, my head seems to tell me that I am already 25. Maybe that is because I have been telling people about how I am out to do 25 BIG things to celebrate my 25th birthday. It is a 2 year journey throughout the start of 24th to the end of 25th birthday.

Call it a Quarter-life crisis, but I do feel I am a little older than before, but that does not mean, I cannot continue to outperform myself continually. Majority of runners do not peak till they are in their late 20s to early 30s. Physically, I feel I have not peaked yet. Week-in, week-out, I have been outdoing myself in training. It does feel good to be doing so, feeling like you are on a continuos upward climb, especially when I am just at a Quarter way through my life.

I don’t want to live a mundane life after university life, dragging myself to work everyday, being stuck in the rat race. I’d rather be in a real race anytime of day. Its the competition that drives me; competition against yourself, to continually challenge yourself & break your own limits.

Breaking the SUB40 10k mark is just one of the 25 things I’ve set out to do.

sub40_10k2.jpg

Another one of my 25 BIG things that I wanted to do was to learn how to swim & complete a triathlon. It has been something that have been bugging me since last year when I was on a road trip up in Airlie Beach, Queensland, Australia. We found a waterfall, & after we parked, we went to check it out. There were many people climbing high up & jumping into the waterfall.

Eating Meatball Subs @ Cedar Creek Falls

Eating Meatball Subs @ Cedar Creek Falls

I really wanted to do it then, but was urged not to, as I did not know how to swim. I have done confidence jumps from 5m dive boards above a deep pool during OCS, but it was under supervision & watchful eyes of professional lifeguards. Hence, I left the waterfall, without jumping down, & it has been bugging me ever since.

They say the best way to conquer your fear, is to face it. And so, I registered myself into a triathlon, albeit a freshman/discovery one (200m swim, 10km bike, 2.4km run). This was a commitment I set out to follow through, Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, talking to friends, telling family about my mission.

Come 18 August 2013, I might be the last to FINISH, but I have put in the training, & I will FINISH no matter what. One fine day, I will go back to Cedar Creek Falls & jump down that waterfall.

My typical training week.

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I order to keep my body in good shape, I train 6 to 7 days a week. Yes, I’m crazy. Its tough, but its possible. Everyone has 24hrs in a day, so taking out time to exercise is just a matter of whether you want it or not.

My entire training revolves around Tuesdays, Thursdays & Sundays, which are my key running days. Tuesdays are always meant for Interval Training as it is a really intensive form of training, its ideal to keep it as far as possible from the Long Slow Distance (LSD) on Sunday. Thursdays are varied from tempo runs, 2.4km time trials, hill repeats. Sunday is reserved for Long Slow Distance as it is a good day to simulate actual race day conditions, as most races are on Sunday morning.

I hit the pool on Monday, Wednesday & Friday during lunch, to train for my triathlon, as well as to cross train to spare my joints from taking too much damage. I also do abs exercises in these evenings to strengthen the core.

Saturdays are meant as a REST day, where I do less intensive physical exercises, but helps in developing other aspects. I tried resting completely & lazing around the whole day, but after awhile, I just couldn’t stand the feeling of sitting around & not doing a single thing the entire day. I felt so lethargic after my REST day, so I guess, its better now with a small bit of exercise.

Singapore Sports Council has early morning pool sessions where its competition pools around the island are open at 0630hrs on specific days. Its great for my BRICK training, where I go for a swim first, then followed by the run at the stadium beside. Its a timed training, so I practice for time in my swim, transition, & run to simulate actual day happenings in the triathlon.

However, do note that it can be quite crowded from 0630 – 0800hrs during early pool sessions as many working adults head there for a early swim. For more information on early pool sessions, go to Singapore Sports Council Website.

I do not focus too much on my arms as I find that at times my arms feel too heavy & requires a lot of energy during a run to support, hence I only have one session of arms & chest training, preferably on monday, in order to shift the attention away from the legs for that day after a LSD on Sunday. I do 30 pull-ups in a go on Wednesday after the pool session just to maintain the integrity of my pull-up muscle groups. Its definitely a far cry from the pull-up regime I had in the military.

I try to make training as fuss-free as possible, i.e. I don’t travel far to workout, so I can save time on commuting, & workouts do not last more than an hour(except for LSDs & longer tempo runs). I prefer to workout alone as it is far quicker as there is no need to rely on the availability of your training partner & I tend to be more focused on the training aspect. However, during LSD runs, I prefer to run with others as it is a good time to catch up & distract yourself over long distances.

To clock mileage, I try to run home as a form of commuting. Its a good way to travel, & beat the peak-hour congestion. Best part is that you don’t have to worry if there is a shower when you arrive at your destination.

I also avoid the gym as I prefer doing workouts in a non-airconditioning environment to produce more perspiration, & whatever I can do in the gym, I feel I can do better outdoors. I struggle to run on a treadmill, & can do no longer than 3km distance, as I feel like a hamster on the wheel. Often having to look towards the belt of the treadmill to ensure have proper footing, which takes away the efficiency of running.

Lastly, I maintain a very disciplined lifestyle, no supper, getting enough sleep, rising early, jumping out of bed, heading out of the door quickly. Its not easy, & I didn’t get to this state overnight. I had everything progressively increased, from training 3 times a week, to 6 times a week, from training once a day, to thrice a day, over the course of months as to prevent suffering from injury.

My typical training week:
Monday – Chest & Arms(AM), Swim(Lunch), Core Workout(PM)
Tuesday – Interval Speedwork(AM)
Wednesday – BRICK + 30 Pull-ups(AM), Swim(Lunch), Core Workout(PM)
Thursday – Tempo Run/2.4km Time Trial/Hill Repeats(AM)
Friday – Static Cardio(AM), Swim(Lunch), Core Workout(PM)
Saturday – REST Day: Light Running Drills, Casual Swim, Stretching & Breathing
Sunday – LSD (Long Slow Distance)

Jurong Lake Run 2013

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7 July 2013 – Following my warm up run at Pocari Sweat Run 2013, I had two weeks to learn from my mistakes & execute the time-distance goal of a SUB40 – 10K.

I signed up for Jurong Lake Run 2013 because it was the only race that was scheduled right after the Pocari Sweat Run that I could register for. I also knew for a fact that Chinese & Japanese Gardens had a relatively flat course, no massive bridges to climb, great for setting a PB.

Arrived early at the start pen to warm up & secure a spot near the front. But learnt the lesson from my previous race, decided not to start right at the front so I don’t get sucked into too fast a pace.
Photo Credits: Vincent Yang

Photo Credits: Vincent Yang

0702h: Flag-off. Can’t see me, but i’m just behind the 2nd Kenyan runner.

Photo Credits: RunSociety

Photo Credits: RunSociety

It was a very fast start, but still had a 2-4second delay before crossing the timing chip device.

Photo Credits: 100PLUS

Photo Credits: 100PLUS

Just targeted a 4min/km pace throughout, learnt to check my watch if I kept in pace. Got into a comfortable rhythm at a faster 3:45min/km pace, and saw that Vivian Tang was right beside me.
Photo Credits: Tan Kim Lai

Photo Credits: Tan Kim Lai

From 1-6km Decided to pace with her, overtaking a few runners in the process.
Once entered the park it was a very curvy course, made for many back-&-forth overtaking.
Photo Credits: Andy Seow

Photo Credits: Andy Seow

Only managed to hang on till the 6km before she pulled away.
Photo Credits: Andy Seow

Photo Credits: Andy Seow

Promptly after she took off, this runner, Sherman, ran along side me.
Photo Credits: RunSociety

Photo Credits: RunSociety

Paced with Sherman for the next 2km till 8km mark when he flagged & I decided to take off.
Photo Credits: RunSociety

Photo Credits: RunSociety

300m from the finish. Saw Vivian at the right turn & decided that I wasn’t too far off 39mins (her typical 10km finishing time), so I decided to go for it. She eventually finished 10km Female champion in the Veteran category.
Photo Credits: Eye-See-Eye-Shoot

Photo Credits: Eye-See-Eye-Shoot

Photo Credits: Chasing Shots

Photo Credits: Chasing Shots

ALL OUT SPRINT TO THE FINISH!
Photo Credits: Eye-See-Eye-Shoot

Photo Credits: Eye-See-Eye-Shoot

Photo Credits: Chasing Shots

Photo Credits: Chasing Shots

Photo Credits: Chasing Shots

Photo Credits: Chasing Shots

Photo Credits: Chasing Shots

Photo Credits: Chasing Shots

Photo Credits: Chasing Shots

Photo Credits: Chasing Shots

200m: still couldn’t see the FINISH & Timer, but just went for it.
Photo Credits: Running Shots

Photo Credits: Running Shots

Made the left turn, & was only left apprx 50-75m, but clock indicated 39:50. Mental countdown started & I gave it all I got.
Photo Credits: Wang Weihan

Photo Credits: Wang Weihan

Crossed the line at 40:02, confirmed by my watch. Typical big shout at the end; a shout of mixed feelings. On one hand, so close to a SUB40 10k, on the other hand, breaking my PB. 

I guess it was a good thing afterall, at least there is still room for improvement.
Photo Credits: Wang Weihan

Photo Credits: Wang Weihan

Some friendly Jurong Lake Running Club Runners, who I met during the warm-up at the start pen. As it was their “Home Ground”, I consulted Johnny (right) during the warm-up at the start pen about the course & asked them more about their running club.

For more information on Jurong Lake Running Club, find them on Facebook.

I’m hanging out in the background with Isaac, a runner I met who finished just infront of me, after collecting medals & refreshments.
Photo Credits: How Xing Quan

Photo Credits: How Xing Quan

Pitstop at Mediacorp Photobooth.
Photo Credits: Mediacorp

Photo Credits: Mediacorp

NEW 10k PB! 40:02″ – what a way to end a great week, tuesday Lions XI M’sia league victory, friday finally managed to do 30 pull-ups in one shot, & PB after 3yrs at JLR.
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Support local!

Like the classic medal, weighted, & stitched lanyard.
Photo Credits: Chasing Shots

Photo Credits: Chasing Shots

Chip Time says 39:58″, but I’ll go with the Gun Time 40:02″ on this one.
Photo Credits: Jurong Lake Run

Photo Credits: Jurong Lake Run

Reflection: Everything went as planned, kept to 4mins/km pacing, while having 30sec buffer times at the kilometer route markers, while giving myself mental high-5s every time I checked the clock.

Felt like I was following the Olympic WR Line when I was pacing with Vivian. I knew her pacing would always be 19mins for 5km, & 39mins for 10km, so I knew if I followed her all the way, I would definitely hit SUB40 10k.

I also noticed that after 6km mark, my pacing slowed down. Maybe it was the case of me trying to speed up catch her shadow, which led me to have an oxygen deficit in my system. And I don’t remember checking the clock for the remaining 4km, which was a big mistake.

Finishing at 40:02″ on gun time gives me a lot of confidence going into the next race knowing that I am within grasp of my goal in just one attempt.

Race Course Advice: Although this course was relatively flat, once you enter the Chinese & Japanese Gardens, it becomes very technical, with many snaking twists & sharp turns. So running in tangent becomes a wrestle for space. Something to lookout for is nearing the finish, there is a stone bridge that crosses a small stream, it has pretty steep gradient, but good thing is that it doesn’t stretch too long.

Also to note, enroute to the Finishing gantry, it is not a long straight road towards it. You won’t see the FINISH till you make a left turn, hence, you will only be left with 75-100m to make a dash for it.

Photo Credits: Jurong Lake Run

Photo Credits: Jurong Lake Run

Next Race:
11 August 2013
King of The Road – 10km
Gardens By the Bay

Although the race route is not out yet, I’m expecting many uphill gradients either on bridges or otherwise. Will try to incorporate hill repeats to train for them. Looking to improve my running form & breathing as well.

The hunt for SUB40 10k continues.

Training for a SUB40 10K

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So you’ve always wanted to join the SUB40 10K club? So did I.

Ever since I started running, I heard people taking about them running 10km in under 40mins. It became a benchmark for excellence. This got firmly etched in my head that I want to accomplish this feat. This would be my first time-distance goal enroute to Boston.

sub40_10k2.jpg

Let’s Break it down:
10km = < 40:00
1km = < 4m:00
2.4km = < 9m36s

This means you have be running an faster IPPT Gold pace throughout the entire 10km distance. All you have to do is 3 key runs every week:

1. Interval Training (Tuesdays)
The sure way to improve is to do Interval training. These speed workout sessions are definitely the fastest way to improve your anaerobic ability, perfect for your short distances.

Note: Before you start doing Intervals, make sure you have a existing aerobic base, which means you have been running regularly, in order to execute these efforts effectively.

The perfect spot would be a stadium track, or if you can’t find a track, find a loop where you can run fast without obstruction or danger.

For week 1-4, Work 1:1 Rest Ratio, Target time: 1min30sec per 400m
Week 1: 3 X 400m
Week 2: 4 X 400m
Week 3: 5 X 400m
Week 4: 6 X 400m

Once you are able to do 6 X 400m, change it up to 800m loops (i.e. 2 rounds of 400m)
Work 1:1 Rest Ratio (i.e. After running 3min00 sec, rest 3min00sec), Target time: 3min00sec per 800m

Week 5: 3 X 800m
Week 6: 4 X 800m
……Increase Progressively by additional 1 X 800m until you hit 8 X 800m…..
Week 10: 8 X 800m

Once you are able to do 8 X 800m, change to Work 2:1 Rest Ratio, i.e. after 3min00sec, rest only 1min30sec. This will increase your body’s ability to recover over a short period of time.

To make it even more challenging, take it up to 12 X 800m or do it in a ladder format – 400m, 800m, 1200m, 1600m, 1200m, 800m, 400m with Work 2:1 Rest ratio. Alternatively, you can do a Yasso 800, which is practically interval training, but during rest intervals, you do not stop completely. Yasso 800 is more practical over longer distances, when it comes to half-marathons and marathons.

2A. 2.4km Time Trial (Thursdays)
To gauge your improvement, do conduct your own time trial every fortnight. You will definitely see significant reduction in times if you put in the time with interval training.

OR

2B. 4 X 2km Tempo Runs (Thursdays)
Tempo Runs are slightly longer than intervals, but not has taxing. Your pace has to be 60-80% of your race pace. If you can hold a pace of 7mins 40secs for every 2km, with a 3min rest period in between sets, a SUB40 10k is definitely within grasp.

3. LSD runs (Sundays)
Do got for Long Slow Distance(LSD) runs of 12-15km to enable your aerobic ability, and clock mileage to be confident enough to conquer the 10km.

Focus on the 3 main run days a week, Intervals, Tempo/Time Trial, and LSD, & you will be able to achieve it without killing your legs.

Remember, Quality over Quantity is the key.